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Vitamin Supplement Safety

The Complete Herbal Guide / Vitamin Supplement Safety
ALFALFA - Uses, Side Effects, Interactions and Warnings

ALFALFA – Uses, Side Effects, Interactions and Warnings

Alfalfa is an herb. People use the leaves, sprouts, and seeds to make medicine.Alfalfa is used for kidney conditions, bladder and prostate conditions, and to increase urine flow. It is also used for high cholesterol, asthma, osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, upset stomach, and a bleeding disorder called thrombocytopenic purpura. People also take alfalfa as a source of vitamins A, C, E, and K4; and minerals calcium, potassium, phosphorous, and iron....

dangerous supplements

4 Dangerous Supplements that Should Be Avoided

AconitePreparations made from this herb are used in very small doses in traditional Chinese medicine and the Ayurvedic tradition to treat pain related to conditions including arthritis, cancer, gout, inflammation, migraine headaches, neuralgia, rheumatism, and sciatica. Aconite comes from monkshood (Aconitum napellus), one of the most poisonous plants known. Studies of compounds from it have found no evidence to support claims for their usefulness as anesthetics or as treatments for circulatory and neurological conditions. Aconite can cause irregular heartbeat, heart failure, and death and even in topical form is dangerous. Country MallowThis herb (Sida cordifolia) contains ephedrine, a potentially dangerous stimulant. For this reason, in 2004, the FDA banned the sale of country mallow as well as ephedra (herb) and all products containing ephedrine. In announcing...

How Much Vitamin D Should You Take?

How Much Vitamin D Should You Take?

The Optimal Dose of Vitamin D Randomized, controlled clinical trials have found that vitamin D supplements extend one’s lifespan. What is the optimal dose? What blood level is associated with living longest? In my nine-part video series on vitamin D back in 2011, I noted that the relationship between vitamin D levels and mortality appeared to be a U-shaped curve—meaning low vitamin D levels were associated with increased mortality. But so were levels that were too high, with the apparent sweet spot around 75 or 80 nanomoles per liter [nmol/L], based on individual studies like this one.Why might higher D levels be associated with a higher risk? Well, this was a population study; so, you can’t be sure which came first. Maybe vitamin D led to higher...